The Right Tires for Different Drives A Primer on Proper Rubber

rubber3Most people have no idea how specialized tires have become. While there have always been tires at different price points and of variable quality, modern tires have splintered into several varieties designed to fulfill a specific purpose.

For example, high-performance summer tires and winter tires differ in almost every way, including proportions, tread pattern, tread depth, and rubber compound. But grip in dry and wet or snowy conditions isn’t the only thing one must consider—ride comfort, tread noise, rolling resistance, tire life, and cost are all affected as a tire is optimized for a particular set of conditions. There are also run-flat tires available for various purposes that you can drive on for 50 miles or so after they’ve lost air pressure, but they often ride somewhat harder, are heavier, and cost more.

Of course, jack-of-all-trades all-season tires still dominate the market, but if you want peak performance during a particular type of driving, you should choose a specialized set. Here are the general categories of tire offered today:

Track Driving/Attacking a Favorite Back Road: Ultra-High Performance Summer Tires
These are the tires that come standard on

Winter / Snow Tire Tech

Selecting the Right Tires

winSelecting the right tires for your vehicle is an important decision. Your safety, as well as driving enjoyment over the next years and thousands of miles will be determined by this decision. The information provided here and the advice/recommendations from the experts at the Tire Rack will ensure you select tires that match your vehicle…and the way you drive it!

How Many Tires Do I Need?

Since tires affect the personality and performance of your vehicle, all four tires should be as identical as possible or handling problems may arise. If your tires don’t match, it is possible that one end of your vehicle won’t respond as quickly or completely as the other, making it more difficult to control.

“Selecting the right tires for your vehicle is an important decision…the experts at Tire Rack will ensure you select tires that match your vehicle…and the way you drive it!”

Consider the Following:

Just One Tire?

If your tires have a lot of remaining tread depth, but you need to replace just one

The Right Tires for Different Drives A Primer on Proper Rubber

qcMost people have no idea how specialized tires have become. While there have always been tires at different price points and of variable quality, modern tires have splintered into several varieties designed to fulfill a specific purpose.

For example, high-performance summer tires and winter tires differ in almost every way, including proportions, tread pattern, tread depth, and rubber compound. But grip in dry and wet or snowy conditions isn’t the only thing one must consider—ride comfort, tread noise, rolling resistance, tire life, and cost are all affected as a tire is optimized for a particular set of conditions. There are also run-flat tires available for various purposes that you can drive on for 50 miles or so after they’ve lost air pressure, but they often ride somewhat harder, are heavier, and cost more.

Of course, jack-of-all-trades all-season tires still dominate the market, but if you want peak performance during a particular type of driving, you should choose a specialized set. Here are the general categories of tire offered today:

Track Driving/Attacking a Favorite Back Road: Ultra-High Performance Summer Tires
These are the tires that come standard on

Mercedes-Benz M-Class

Mercedes-Benz recently launched its new ML63 AMG. Last month, the high-quality carmaker GL63 AMG launched in Germany. Three-star Company has kept its word to bring more cars held a few months back in Auto Expo. The already powerful M-Class is now marked more powerful with the ML63 AMG. It has massive front air intakes, quadchrome exhaust pipes and lined the entire automotive famous AMG badge. The majestic power of 525bhp AMG ML63 figures furnace of 5.5 liters and generating torque of 700nm.

 

Exterior

This series of models is very attractive and has many elements adorned on his body, which makes it more attractive. The facade is quite large and has a wide grille, to improve the body a much bigger picture. Moreover, this goal has three blades that are chrome and improvised the brightness of this car. A large air intake is also integrated for better engine cooling. There are LED daytime running lights, bi-xenon headlights with projectors that are integrated into the grouping of the LEDs on the front.

 

Wheels

The 250 CDI is equipped with 18 AMG wheels (18-inch wheels), 10-spoke with them, they are made of

Auto portal reviews the Mahindra NuvoSport Price in India

Mahindra and Mahindra are well known for its sporty and tough utility vehicles like the Mahindra Scorpio, Mahindra Thar, TUV 300 and the KUV. Mahindra Nova Sport is one such SUV that is gearing up for its launch very soon. The expected date of arrival is 4th of April 2016. Mahindra Nuvo Sport is a seven seater like the Quanto and gets driven by the diesel engine. Mahindra’s Quanto did not meet and live the expectations of the public and hence all the eyes are focused on this newly designed Nuvo. Mahindra Nuvo is designed in the Mahindra’s Scorpio platform.

nuvo5

Exterior Reviews

Since the Mahindra NuvoSport is considered as a rebranded Quanto, the exterior and interior features are much under analysis. The website has no detailed information and with clock sticking to its launch, the observed exterior features of this Nuvo is much more attractive, Sporty, peppy when compared. The look and feel is very aggressive with modifications in its front grille, bonnet, and hexagonal head lamps and so on. The side profile gets a good allow wheel and the rear side alone

5 Tips for Choosing the Right Auto Body Shop

It’s not uncommon for estimates from different body shops to vary wildly. One shop might give you an estimate for $500 while another wants $2,000 for the work. What’s the difference? And when is it OK to choose the cheaper shop?

John Mallette, owner of Burke Auto Body & Paint, in Long Beach, California, knows better than most people how to choose a reliable shop. Mallette started working on cars when he was 12 years old and has been in the body shop business for 24 years. Here are some of his tips for choosing the right shop to work on your car — particularly when you’re the one paying the bills.

1) Pay Attention to Word-of-Mouth
Any business can advertise, but you’ll do better with a shop that friends, family or acquaintances recommend. It’s a business that has proven it can satisfy customers. And it might not be the biggest or best-known shop in your area.

Mallette went to a shop years ago on such recommendations and found that the owner was a “real stand-up guy…. He doesn’t advertise on the Internet; it’s a family-owned shop,” Mallette says. “But, golly, if you

What Your Check Engine Light Is Telling You

When your car’s “Check Engine” light comes on, it’s usually accompanied by a sinking feeling in the pit of your stomach. The light could mean a costly problem, like a bad catalytic converter, or it could be something minor, like a loose gas cap. But in many cases, it means at minimum that you’ll be visiting the car dealer to locate the malfunction and get the light turned off.

The Check Engine light — more formally known as the Malfunction Indicator Lamp (MIL) — is a signal from the car’s engine computer that something is wrong. The car dealer’s service department can diagnose the problem for about $75. But there’s a way to preview what the problem might be.

Prior to 1996, carmakers had their own engine diagnostic systems, primarily to ensure their cars were compliant with Environmental Protection Agency pollution-control requirements. Starting with model-year 1996, automakers standardized their systems under a protocol called OBD-II, which stipulated a standardized list of diagnostic trouble codes (DTC) and mandated that all cars provide a universal connector to access this information. It’s usually located under the steering column and is easy to access.

Deciphering the Code
Do-it-yourselfers can buy inexpensive code readers that connect

How Old and Dangerous Are Your Tires

In February 2008, the owner of a 1998 Ford Explorer in Georgia needed a new tire for his SUV and ended up buying a used one. When he was driving two weeks later, the tread suddenly separated from the tire. The Explorer went out of control and hit a motorcycle, killing its rider. An analysis of the used tire revealed that it was nearly 10 years old.

More recently, an investigation into the cause of the accident that killed the actor Paul Walker revealed that the Porsche Carrera GT in which he was riding had nine-year-old tires. The California Highway Patrol noted that the tires’ age might have compromised their drivability and handling characteristics, according to the Los Angeles Times.

These incidents illustrate not only the potential danger of buying used tires but also the perils of driving on aging tires — including those that have never spent a day on the road.

For years, people have relied on a tire’s tread depth to determine its condition. But the rubber compounds in a tire deteriorate with time, regardless of the condition of the tread. An old tire poses a safety hazard.

For some people, old tires might never be an issue. If

How To Fix Your Car’s Oxygen Sensor

If your car’s “Check Engine” light is glaring at you, it’s probably because the oxygen sensor is malfunctioning. That’s right, the oxygen sensor. It’s a little device that’s a mystery for most drivers but its misbehavior is the problem that most commonly triggers a Check Engine light, according to CarMD.com, which sells an automotive diagnostic tool and provides repair information. The oxygen sensor unseats the formerly most common Check Engine light culprit: a loose gas cap. There are fewer reports of that problem because savvy motorists have learned to fix it themselves and consumers now buy new cars with capless gas tanks.

But don’t despair. Replacing your car oxygen sensor will keep you from wasting money by burning extra gas, and the repair isn’t horribly expensive. We know this firsthand. We had to replace the O2 sensor on our 1996 Lexus ES 300, the subject of our Debt-Free Car project, and it wasn’t as much of a hassle or expense as we had feared.

After the dreaded Check Engine light appeared in our Lexus, we plugged the CarMD device into the car’s computer to read the error code. In our case, the code was P0135, which meant that the oxygen

Eagle Spyder GT Is the Most Beautiful Jaguar E-Type Restomod Yet

UK-based Eagle has been working on Jaguar E-Types for 30 years, turning out both exquisitely restored originals and astonishing restomods. This is the shop that built the Speedster, a no-roof, low-windshield beauty based on a Jaguar E-Type that Jeremy Clarkson famously called “the most beautiful thing I have ever seen.”

And Eagle’s latest model, the Spyder GT, carries on the company’s tradition of jaw-dropping beauty

Compared to the Eagle Speedster, whose low-slung bodywork was heavily modified from the original E-Type, the Spyder GT sticks a little closer to the original Jaguar shape. The windshield, while rakish and low, isn’t cut quite as dramatically as the Speedster, and unlike the Speedster this version has a folding canvas roof. Think of it as a gorgeous grand tourer, compared to the sunny-days-only Speedster.

Eagle didn’t provide any exact specifications in its announcement of the Spyder GT, mainly because each one will be built to order to the buyer’s exact spec. Nor did Eagle say how many would be built, though the company hinted it would be a very small number.

This, or a Jaguar F-Type Project 7? Now that would be a difficult decision

This Is

GM rechristens Powertrain unit as Global Propulsion Systems

In its latest break from its storied but perceptually stodgy past, General Motors has renamed its Powertrain division—since 1992 the unit responsible for design, development and manufacturing of engines and transmissions—to GM Global Propulsion Systems. The world’s third-largest automaker believes the new name more accurately reflects the company’s expanding development and deployment of non-traditional drivetrains that, from gasoline-engine hybrids to hydrogen fuel cells, use varying degrees of electrification to propel the vehicle and enhance its efficiency.

Dan Nicholson, Vice President, GM Global Propulsion Systems, said in a statement, “Gone are the days when a gasoline engine and a transmission are designed independently meet a customer’s expectations. Today’s customer is demanding unprecedented technology integration that requires unprecedented engineering and supplier partnerships. The diversity of our propulsion systems requires a name that reflects what we are already working on and delivering to our customers. I believe this will establish an industry trend.”

Nearly half of the Global Propulsion Systems engineering workforce is involved with alternative or electrified propulsion systems, according to GM. Recent model introductions employing advanced drivetrains include the 2016 Chevrolet Volt extended range electric, Chevrolet’s 2017 Bolt EV, and the 2017 Cadillac CT6 plug-in hybrid

How to Take Care of Your Tires

1.Purchase a set of four identical snow tires imprinted with the mountain snowflake symbol. They need to be the right size for your vehicle and have a tread depth of at least 6/32-inch. Be prepared for the worst weather possible. In Northeast Ohio, that ranges from freezing rain, sleet and ice to inches (and sometimes even a foot or more) of snow. Although all-season radials may give you good performance under many conditions, they won’t give you the grip, braking and handling you need for winter.

2.In the spring, you need to remove snow tires. Otherwise you’re spending money unnecessarily. Because they are made with softer rubber compounds and deeper tread patterns, winter tires can be noisier than all-season tires and will wear down more quickly in warm weather.

3.Don’t use the “penny test” to check for tread wear.If you’re using the old penny test to make sure your tires are still good (which involves placing a penny into the groove of a tire and checking to see how much of Lincoln’s head is visible), you may be driving on tires that are both dangerous and illegal. In Ohio, tires that are down to 2/32-inch tread (top of Lincoln’s head) must be

Tire Maintenance and Safety

Properly maintained tires will give you a safer, more comfortable ride and a longer tread life.

Here are a few tips on proper tire maintenance:

  • Air Pressure
  • Rotation
  • Alignment
  • Balancing
  • Vibration
  • Treadwear Indicators
  • Driving Habits
  • Tire Service Life Recommendation
  • Install Two New Tires on the Rear Axle

Air Pressure

Proper inflation is the single most important factor in tire care. The inflation pressure imprinted on the sidewall of the tire is the maximum operating pressure determined by the tire manufacturer. It is not necessarily the correct inflation for your vehicle’s tires.

You should always use the inflation recommended by the vehicle manufacturer. This information can be found in the owner’s manual and often on a label located in the vehicle’s doorjamb, inside the fuel hatch, or on the glove compartment door.

Tips

  • We recommend checking air pressure once a month and before long trips.
  • Always check the pressure when the tires are “cold” — at least three hours after the vehicle has been stopped and before it has been driven one mile. It’s best to inflate your tires in the morning.
  • Don’t forget to check the spare tire.
  • Replace valves when you buy new tires.
  • Buy good quality valve caps that can contain the inflation air, should the core of the valve fail for any reason.
  • Purchase a good pressure

How do I care for my tires

It will help me save

Checking tire air pressure, and regular tire maintenance such as rotation, alignment and inspections can help you save money

It can extend the life of your tires so you don’t have to buy as often

Simple things like checking your tires’ pressure to make sure that they are properly inflated can make a real difference in how long your tires last. Under or over-inflated tires don’t wear evenly and won’t last as long. For example, a tire that is consistently 20% under- inflated can last 20% less. That means a tire that should normally last 60,000 miles would be worn out by 48,000 miles. Also, since the front and rear axles and right and left sides of your car wear down your tires differently, rotating your tires regularly between the different positions will ensure they wear evenly and last longer.

It can save you money on fuel

  • Under-inflated tires are one of the biggest causes of using excess fuel.
  • Under-inflated tires have higher rolling resistance, which means it takes more effort from the engine to move your vehicle.

    It ensures your safety

    Your tires are the only point of contact that your vehicle has with

How to choose new tires

When replacing your car’s tires, price shouldn’t be the first consideration; at least, that’s the opinion of many tire experts. Other factors, such as safety, grip and ride quality, should top the reasons-to-buy list.

Most of us don’t think much about our tires until one goes flat or they become so worn that we simply can’t ignore them. Otherwise, they are just those black, round things on each corner of our car. When was the last time you closely inspected your tires for uneven wear or cuts? When was the last time you checked the tire pressure?

And when the time arrives to finally replace those worn tires, we’re not very good at doing our research to find the best fit. We treat choosing new tires with less care than we take choosing a new flat-screen television.

In reality, no single component in a car is more critical to its stability, handling and ride quality than its tires. According to Kurt Berger, manager of consumer sales engineering at Bridgestone, when properly inflated, the right tire can improve fuel economy and save your life.

Tires are not created equal. Each reacts differently in terms of

Selecting the Right Tire

Selecting the right tire for your needs and budget is something you can accomplish by using the search modes and helpful information available on our web site.

Take a few minutes to read these helpful guidelines and take a look at the links, which will help you understand key information.

Determine When You Need Tires
  • Tires are considered to be worn out at 2/32 inch minimum tread depth.
  • In wet conditions 4/32 inch or less tread means a significant loss of wet traction due to shallower grooves and sipes.
  • In snow conditions, traction noticeably diminishes at 6/32 inch tread depth. Shallower lug and groove depths limit a tire’s ability to “bite” into snow and clean out snow compressed into the tread.
  • Irregular wear necessitates early tire replacement.
Determine How Many Tires You Need
  • If you need one tire (due to damage, a defect, irregular wear, etc.) it is recommended that you replace it with a tire that has a similar brand, line, speed rating, and load capacity to your three remaining tires.
  • If you need two tires due to poor or irregular wear, replace the tire with ones of similar or better quality. The two new tires

How to Drive Safely in the Rain

  1. Keep both hands on the steering wheel at all times! Keep all distractions, such as cell phones or even the radio, off and away from you. While focus to your front do Take a Look in Back View Mirror as well Right Hand side & Left Hand side so that you get an 360 degree over view what is happening around any mud slide or falling tree, electric pole, hanging electrical wires , or in coming hazard etc.
  2. Turn on your headlights. Many states in the U.S. require headlights when it’s raining, even in broad daylight. This will make it easier for you to see what is in front of you; thus, preventing any accidents.
  3.  Keep a minimum of a good five car length from the car in front of you. You never know what other drivers are going to do or what could happen to you! If that feels too close or too far a rule of thumb is 1 second of following distance per 10 mph (16 km/h). That holds true especially in bad weather.
  4. Drive at or below the speed limit to the extent that you are comfortable with, and can see far enough in front of you to appropriately make driving

How to choose the right tires for driving conditions

Choosing the right set (or sets) of tires can help create a safer, more comfortable ride in a variety of weather and driving conditions.

Which tires best match my driving conditions?

It is important to analyze your driving conditions and then pick the tires that best suit them. Do you drive your vehicle in dry weather? Or in rain and snow? Do you drive your truck only on highways, or do you also go off-roading? These tips and other similar information about specific driving conditions can help you choose the right tires for your needs.

Consider the worst possible weather conditions

If you use more than one set of tires for your conditions (for example, summer tires in summer and winter tires in winter), you can select tires that exactly meet your diverse needs. If you use one set of tires for all seasons, you may get good performance under many conditions, but you may compromise your vehicle’s performance when the conditions are at their worst. So you should consider selecting your tires so that they match the worst driving condition you expect to encounter.

Factor in your typical driving conditions

If you just drive around town, almost any tire will do. But if you drive

How to choose the best tires for your car, SUV, or truck

Shopping for new tires can be a daunting task. There’s no way to tell which one provides the best grip, the longest life, or the shortest stopping distance by sight or feel. That’s why Consumer Reports tests 50 or more tire models each year, with each going through as many as 14 rigorous evaluations.

Spend more, get more

In recent years, we’ve found you generally get what you pay for. No matter the type, tires that combine the best grip with the longest tread life may cost a little more, but they are worth the extra money in the long run.

For example, our tests have shown the best all-season tires can last as many as 97,000 miles; the worst would need replacing after 55,000 miles. It’s pretty straightforward: a $130 tire that will last twice as long as an $87 tire is a better bet, assuming other factors are equal. Still, the cheaper tire may be just fine if you won’t be keeping your car for long. Many tires have a pro-rated tread-wear warranty—meaning the balance of undriven miles will be credited toward the cost of the new tire. The downside: You’re still on

Hydroplaning Basics Why it Occurs and How You Can Avoid it

Have you ever skidded while driving on a wet road for what seemed like a split second or even longer? Even if you didn’t lose complete control, you most likely experienced hydroplaning.

What is Hydroplaning?

The term hydroplaning is commonly used to refer to the skidding or sliding of a cars tires across a wet surface. Hydroplaning occurs when a tire encounters more water than it can scatter. Water pressure in the front of the wheel pushes water under the tire, and the tire is then separated from the road surface by a thin film of water and loses traction. The result is loss of steering, braking and power control.

Rubber tires have tread (grooves) that are designed to channel water from beneath the tire. This creates higher friction with the road surface and can help prevent or minimize instances of hydroplaning.

When does Hydroplaning Occur?

Hydroplaning can occur on any wet road surface, however, the first 10 minutes of a light rain can be the most dangerous.

When light rain mixes with oil residue on the road surface, it creates slippery conditions that can cause vehicles, especially those traveling speeds in

What are the differences in tire tread design and what do they mean

This article originally appeared in the August 2012 issue of Road and Track.

Directional (unidirectional)

Directional tire tread features a large V-shaped pattern with large spaces or grooves between the tread blocks. The grooves improve hydroplaning resistance at high speeds by siphoning water more efficiently through the tread making these tires ideal for performance and ultra-high performance applications. Tires with directional tread are designed to roll in one direction and have an arrow on the sidewall of the tire that shows which way the tires should roll. They are meant to be rotated front-to-back (and vice versa) but not side-to-side because of the directional design. Vehicles equipped with different size tires on the front and rear (staggered), prohibit the ability to rotate directional tires unless they are remounted.

Symmetrical

Symmetrical tire tread has the same pattern – continuous grooves and/or independent lugs – across the whole tire. This type of tire is the most common and found on most non-high-performance passenger cars because it is typically quiet and long-lasting. Also, they can be rotated in many different ways, which helps to prolong the life of the tires and makes them more versatile.

Asymetrical

Tips for Driving Safely in the Rain

It’s perhaps surprising, but true: Driving on a rainy day is more dangerous than driving on a snowy one. When the rain starts to fall and pavement is wet, your likelihood of a crash is higher than during wintry conditions like snow, sleet and ice, according to data from the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (NHTSA).

After averaging 10 years of statistics, NHTSA researchers found that 46 percent of weather-related crashes happened during rainfall, but just 17 percent while it was snowing or sleeting. Those statistics are partially explained, of course, by the fact that many drivers have the good sense to stay home during a bad snowstorm, says Debbie Hersman, president and CEO of the National Safety Council, which offers defensive driving courses. But the statistics also reflect a sobering truth, she says: Drivers often do not respect the rain, and fail to adjust their driving habits to hazardous conditions.

Here is how to reduce the chances of being a rainy day statistic, according to safety experts.

Get Your Car Rain-Ready: Tire tread is key, says Bill Van Tassel, Ph.D., manager of driver training programs for the AAA national office in Orlando, Florida. Dig